May It Be So

May It Be So by Justin McRoberts & Scott Erickson

May It Be So. This little book is a forty-day journey in praying the pattern of the Lord’s Prayer. It is divided into week-long sections that focus on praying in the pattern/theme of each phrase of the Lord’s Prayer. It contains Guided Prayers, Contemplative Imagery, Meditations (short stories that reflect something the authors gleaned from this particular section of the Lord’s Prayer), and Suggested Practices (ways to apply the insights that the week’s images and prayers have brought to you).

Maybe I’m just too left-brained, but I struggled with some of the imagery. Some were really profound. Some just left me going, “huh?” I love the simplicity of one or two-line prayers. I’d love to have a 365-day calendar that has these sorts of prayers on it. Some examples:

  • May even my grief and brokenness become, in some way, a gift to the world around me. May my whole life be an offering.
  • May I have vision in and through my trials rather than search for ways to escape them.
  • May I learn to take joy in what it costs me to share my life with those I love. (wow!)
  • May my initial posture toward strangers be kindness and grace rather than suspicion and fear.

I really enjoyed the meditations at the beginning of each week. They really bring the week’s ‘theme’ from the Lord’s Prayer in to focus and set the tone for the week.

The one thing I don’t like about this book is the price! On Amazon.com it is $9.99 for the Kindle edition and $12.15 for the hardcover. That’s a lot of money for the content. Maybe I’ve just been trying to balance my tight budget for too long, but that’s a hefty chunk of change for me. Maybe the library will have a copy to check out?

I’m blessed to have received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. I’ll definitely be using it from time to time as a way to streamline and intensify my prayer life.

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No Ocean Too Wide

This is a first for me. I’ve been reviewing books for years, and this is the first book that I just couldn’t make myself finish. When reading for pleasure, I typically will jettison a book that doesn’t suck me in within the first few chapters. I gave No Ocean Too Wide a serious try. I read over half of the book! I just couldn’t force myself to go any further. I tried. I really tried.

No Ocean Too Wide was the sort of book I usually love: historical fiction. Set at the turn of the century, it chronicles the story of four siblings, three of which found themselves as “British Home Children”.

Between 1869 and the late 1930s, over 100,000 juvenile migrants were sent to Canada from the British Isles during the child emigration movement. Motivated by social and economic forces, churches and philanthropic organizations sent orphaned, abandoned and pauper children to Canada. Many believed that these children would have a better chance for a healthy, moral life in rural Canada, where families welcomed them as a source of cheap farm labour and domestic help.

After arriving by ship, the children were sent to distributing and receiving homes, such as Fairknowe in Brockville, and then sent on to farmers in the area. Although many of the children were poorly treated and abused, others experienced a better life here than if they had remained in the urban slums of England. Many served with the Canadian and British Forces during both World Wars.

https://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/immigration/immigration-records/home-children-1869-1930/Pages/home-children.aspx

Having just read Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate, I was expecting something similar (I highly recommend Before We Were Yours, by the way!). While there are similarities in the stories, there’s no comparison in the books. I just could not believe how slow-moving the storyline is in No Ocean Too Wide or how little character development there was.

I can’t recommend this one.

*I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

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Filed under Christian, Fiction, Uncategorized

Eat Live Thrive Diet

Eat Live Thrive Diet: A Lifestyle Plan to Rev Up Your Midlife Metabolism

Most women who are 45 or older struggle to keep their weight under control, or at the very least struggle with “middle age spread” around their waist. I’ve done a lot of reading on intermittent fasting and, from my experience, and the experiences of friends, there’s really something to it! It works!

Eat Live Thrive Diet incorporates intermittent fasting with carbohydrate reduction and food sensitivity screening, among other things. The authors assert that some women gain more weight from certain categories of food (dairy, grains, etc.). These recommendations make a LOT of sense to me. While the experience of an elimination diet is complicated and difficult, it seems a worthwhile pursuit for women who are struggling to lose weight.

The authors also recommend a “cleansing” component which consists of a vinegar/lemon juice drink, and a cranberry drink (unsweetened pure cranberry juice, water, and stevia or other non-caloric natural sweetener), along with fiber and vitamin/mineral supplements.

Although I’m currently following a low-carb diet coupled with intermittent fasting, I’m not seeing results as fast as I’d like to. I thought I would try the recommendations of the Eat Live Thrive Diet to see if they’d help boost my weight loss however, the more I read, the more complicated the regimen sounded and the more overwhelmed I felt. I’ve decided that the K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple, Stupid) principle was the best approach for me, so I’m still using low-carb coupled with intermittent fasting. I’m OK with weight loss of 5 pounds a month (although it would just be nice to lose all the weight I want to lose in 4 weeks and go into “maintenance”).

Having tried every diet under the sun since I was a preteen, and after doing a lot of research on intermittent fasting and the role insulin plays in gaining weight, I’m convinced that fasting to lower my insulin resistance, and fasting to maintain low insulin levels going forward, is the only workable plan to achieving and maintaining weight loss. For me, a simple plan that has lots of flexibility is the way to go right now. Sadly, Eat Live Thrive Diet doesn’t fit that paradigm. Maybe when life is less complicated…

**I received a complementary copy of Eat Live Thrive Diet from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

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Filed under Christian, healthy living, Non-Fiction, Self-help, women