Tag Archives: history

The Luckiest One by Harkiné Hagopian

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The Luckiest One by Harkiné Pilibosian Hagopian is the memoir of a survivor of the Armenian genocide (circa 1915). The content of this book was transcribed from oral interviews with Harkiné herself. Her grandson, Robert W. Rollings edited the transcripts for readability, but otherwise the story is told in Harkiné’s own words.

Rollings provides “Introduction” and “End Matter” sections that give context to the story. Harkinè is a memorable character who is able (in her 90’s at the time the interviews were conducted) to remember specifics from her childhood and young adulthood as the deportation and subsequent genocide unfolds around her.

Her sister married into a harem to save the Pilibosian family. Harkiné, her father and grandmother live under the protection of the Arab for some time before Harkiné marries (at the age of 14) to escape being married off to another Muslim man.

Through it all, Harkinè shines as a spunky, intelligent, resourceful and “lucky” girl. She immigrates to the United States (Indianapolis, Indiana) and raises five children who go on to give depth to her legacy.

I read this book because I am a friend of Harkiné’s youngest daughter, Mary Hagopian. Robert W. Rollings did an excellent job of setting the stage for the story, including scores of pictures, maps, charts and a family tree to keep track of the interesting characters. I highly recommend this fascinating book!

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Filed under Autobiography, Non-Fiction, Uncategorized

The Wood’s Edge

The Wood's Edge

 

I’m a huge fan of historical fiction, so when I got the chance to review The Wood’s Edge by Lori Benton I was thrilled. The book didn’t disappoint! The Wood’s Edge is the first in the Pathfiners Series and it left me eager to read book two!

From the back cover:
At the wood’s edge cultures collide. Can two families survive the impact?

The 1757 New York frontier is home to the Oneida tribe and to British colonists, yet their feet rarely walk the same paths.

On the day Fort William Henry falls, Major Reginald Aubrey is beside himself with grief. His son, born that day, has died in the arms of his sleeping wife. When Reginald comes across an Oneida mother with newborn twins, one white, one brown, he makes a choice that will haunt the lives of all involved. He steals the white baby and leaves his own child behind. Reginald’s wife and foundling daughter, Anna, never suspect the truth about the boy they call William, but Reginald is wracked by regret that only intensifies with time, as his secret spreads its devastating ripples.

When the long buried truth comes to light, can an unlikely friendship forged at the wood’s edge provide a way forward? For a father tormented by fear of judgment, another by lust for vengeance. For a mother still grieving her lost child. For a brother who feels his twin’s absence, another unaware of his twin’s existence. And for Anna, who loves them both–Two Hawks, the mysterious Oneida boy she meets in secret, and William, her brother. As paths long divided collide, how will God direct the feet of those who follow Him?

The Wood’s Edge is a story of faith, repentance, redemption and of God’s power to heal us from our wounds. I love Lori Benton’s writing. It is descriptive and conveys the tone of the scene quite well. I found myself really empathizing with all the characters as their stories unwound.

If you’re a fan of historical fiction, especially if you’re interested in the events preceding the Revolutionary War, you’ll love this book. I highly recommend it!

*I received a complementary proof of this book in exchange for my honest review.

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Filed under Christian, Fiction, Historical Fiction

American Patriots: Answering the Call to Freedom

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American Patriots: Answering the Call to Freedom is full of stories of inspiring patriots. The chapters share biographies of citizens who sacrificed in the formation of our nation. Most of the patriots included were unknown to me before I read the book. Don’t assume that the book is just about white males, either! It’s not!

Santorum organizes his book into sections, appropriately titled “Life” “Liberty” and “The Pursuit of Happiness.” It is easy to take our freedoms for granted. Each story included in American Patriots remind me that real people, with real lives, real dreams and real pain sacrificed to bring us this great nation.

This book is inspiring and would make a great gift for any patriot or history lover. It is perfect for homeschooling, with chapters that are relatively brief and self-contained. I highly recommend American Patriots: Answering the Call to Freedom for anyone who wants to be reminded that there were great sacrifices made on behalf of the citizens of the United States of America and to anyone who needs inspiration that there are principles worth the sacrifice.

I received this book free from Tyndale House Pubishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Filed under Christian, Non-Fiction, politics, Uncategorized